coltonwbrown: Superb Warblers Sarah Stone (176…

coltonwbrown:

Superb Warblers

Sarah Stone (1760–1844)

Trailblazing 18th-Century Artist Sarah Stone’s Stunning Natural History Paintings of Exotic, Endangered, and Extinct Species

Sydney surveys this week #GSRfieldtrip #marin…

Sydney surveys this week #GSRfieldtrip #marineexplorer #unswbees

Sydney surveys this week #GSRfieldtrip #marineexplorer #unswbees by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Adding to our store of surveys in Sydney this week; hoping there will be enough people to interview despite the unsettled weather. Fairlight, Sydney Harbour (pic from surveys last month when the weather was finer)

Regular

lwhittie:

Amur leopard study on silver Essdee student grade scratchboard.

Lepidoptera : manuscript

Lepidoptera : manuscript: undefined

cincylibrary:

cincylibrary:

Great blue Heron. From John James Audubon’s Birds of America, 1834.

wapiti3: Genera insectorum. By Townsend, Lee H…

wapiti3:

Genera insectorum.

By Townsend, Lee Hill, 1903-
Wytsman, P. (Philogène) 1866-1925
Publication info Bruxelles,L. Desmet-Verteneuil [etc.]1902-1970.
Contributor: University Library, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign
BIODIV LIBRARY

thetypologist:

thetypologist:

British bees. Biodiversity Heritage Library.

Regular

lwhittie:

Almost finished with this first layer.

Small marine reserves can work if sanctuary, …

Small marine reserves can work if sanctuary, well located and managed #marineexplorer

Small marine reserves can work if sanctuary, well located and managed #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Whilst the most effective marine reserve are large ones, small reserves can work if they are full sanctuary zones, located in sheltered areas with complex habitat, and supported by the local community. Fly Point is Port Stephens is a great example with incredible fish diversity and abundance. See our 2018 paper rdcu.be/IuoS

ekbelsher: People sometimes ask me if watercol…

ekbelsher:

People sometimes ask me if watercolour blocks work. My best answer: sometimes, but it very much depends on how you use them. They’re certainly convenient. I used one for the owl illustration above because I had a tight deadline (I was a student) and I knew exactly what I wanted to draw, and how to draw it. This meant I could work right on the block, rather than drawing it first on sketch paper and then transferring it using a light pad (which only works with loose sheets of paper). 

The main problem with watercolour blocks is that if you get them really wet, repeatedly, as you often do when you paint, the glued-down edges of the block come apart and the paper buckles and warps. This is deeply frustrating because wet paint doesn’t travel properly over warped paper, so it can actually wreck the painting. Even if it doesn’t ruin it, it looks kind of unprofessional (although there are ways to flatten paper after the fact – I’ll get to that later).

In this illustration, the careful ink drawing does most of the heavy lifting. I put a wash over it because colour has a way of bringing things to life, but all of the detail is in the pen lines. The reason a watercolour block was OK for this piece was that (a) it’s just one loose wash that doesn’t approach the edges of the paper; and (b) the paint doesn’t actually cover much of the entire paper area. The wimpy glued edges of the watercolour block can handle this small amount of abuse, but not much more. 🙂 

So, say you did use a watercolour block, the edges pulled free, and now you have a warped painting you need to flatten. Here’s a good way to fix it: get some cheap computer paper that’s BIGGER than the area of your painting. Lay one piece of cheap paper down. Put your painting face-down on it. Using a large flat brush, get the entire back of your painting wet. Put a second sheet of cheap paper on top. Put a pile of heavy books on top. Leave overnight. Problem solved! 🙂