Author: Marine Explorer

Leafy Seadragon Phycodurus eques – I love the …

Leafy Seadragon Phycodurus eques – I love the way they move without body movement thanks to their transparent fins – just like floating seaweed #marineexplorer

Southern hermit crab Paguristes frontalis #ma…

Southern hermit crab Paguristes frontalis #marineexplorer

Southern hermit crab Paguristes frontalis #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

A large hermit crab found on Australia’s Great Southern Reef, distinguished by its lack of hairs and large left claw. Port Noarlunga South Australia. reeflifesurvey.com/species/paguristes-frontalis/

Second Valley jetty, headland and remnants of…

Second Valley jetty, headland and remnants of tramway #marineexplorer #GSRfieldtrip #UNSWbees

Second Valley jetty, headland and remnants of tramway #marineexplorer #GSRfieldtrip #UNSWbees by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

An interesting village tucked away on the Fleurieu peninsula south of Adelaide, South Australia. This is one of our social-ecological survey locations

Glint between the rocks #marineexplorer by Jo…

Glint between the rocks #marineexplorer

Glint between the rocks #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Lichens dapple the eroded rocks on top of Mt Wellington as the late afternoon sun peeks between them

Primrose Sands shore long exposure #marineexp…

Primrose Sands shore long exposure #marineexplorer

Primrose Sands shore long exposure #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Cradle Mountain in the rain #marineexplorer b…

Cradle Mountain in the rain #marineexplorer

Cradle Mountain in the rain #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Cradle Mountain, Tasmania

Healthy balance of urchins and kelp #marineex…

Healthy balance of urchins and kelp #marineexplorer

Healthy balance of urchins and kelp #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Whilst there are major concerns about the spread of urchin barrens – and rightly so – it is possible for kelp and urchins to achieve a healthy balance in a system with adequate urchin predators. Tinderbox Marine Reserve in Tasmania is a sanctuary zone with many large lobsters to keep urchins in check (I saw 4 on one dive).

Change indicator – Weedy seadragon Phyllopter…

Change indicator - Weedy seadragon Phyllopteryx taeniolatus #marineexplorer #GSRfieldtrip day 42 #UNSWbees

Change indicator – Weedy seadragon Phyllopteryx taeniolatus #marineexplorer #GSRfieldtrip day 42 #UNSWbees by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Divers notice charismatic animals like seadragons, so these animals can provide indications of change over time scales exceeding our biodiversity survey data. At two sites we’re surveying in Tasmania, numerous people describe the loss of giant kelp and changes to seahorse and seadragon populations over several decades.

Ninepin marine reserve and Verona Sands #mari…

Ninepin marine reserve and Verona Sands #marineexplorer #GSRfieldtrip

Ninepin marine reserve and Verona Sands #marineexplorer #GSRfieldtrip by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Ninepin Point Marine Reserve is cared for by a partnership between the local community, including students from the local school, and Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife. It is treasured for its unusual marine community, due to the shallow dark waters of the Huon river

Below the kelp zone – Eaglehawk, The Thumbs #…

Below the kelp zone - Eaglehawk, The Thumbs #marineexplorer

Below the kelp zone – Eaglehawk, The Thumbs #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Once you get below the kelp zone on the Great Southern Reef, you find a spectacular sponge-dominated marine community. The cold clear waters – if you can tolerate them for long enough – host a marvelous array of marine life.