Author: Marine Explorer

Cunjevoi Pyura praeputialis by John Turnbull …

Cunjevoi Pyura praeputialis

Cunjevoi Pyura praeputialis by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Previously P. stolonifera praeputialis… this is one of the largest and most common ascidians in the intertidal zone. Commonly known as a sea squirt, as it squirts a long stream of water out when disturbed.

King of the Castle – Red cuttle Sepia mestus …

King of the Castle - Red cuttle Sepia mestus #marineexplorer

King of the Castle – Red cuttle Sepia mestus #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Henry Head

Back in black – Oysters at Shiprock #marineex…

Back in black - Oysters at Shiprock #marineexplorer

Back in black – Oysters at Shiprock #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

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My first photos were black and white. I remember the happy days of Ilford film and my darkroom, made from our converted laundry. Watching the picture emerge in the development tray. Back then, exposure and contrast were adjusted in the enlargement process, using timers and paper types. Today it’s much easier – so perhaps we forget the mystique of a B&W image. It adds a level of abstraction that makes you focus on the tones and patterns more than the subject.

Fish to invertebrate ratio #marineexplorer by…

Fish to invertebrate ratio #marineexplorer

Fish to invertebrate ratio #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

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Whilst some ecologists dispute the idea of the balance of nature, I observe what I regard as “out of balance” communities on most dives. This shot, from a popular fished area, has hundreds of invertebrates for every fish… and even the one fish is tiny. Henry Head.

Sponges #marineexplorer by John Turnbull Vi…

Sponges #marineexplorer

Sponges #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

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Henry Head. 18 m deep.

Micro mid mega #marineexplorer by John Turnbu…

Micro mid mega #marineexplorer

Micro mid mega #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

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Can you tell whether this is a close up of a porous rock, and mid shot of a rock shelf, or a long shot of a coastal plain? Interesting exercise that reminds me of fractals. I can imagine it being all three…

Fish diversity #marineexplorer by John Turnbu…

Fish diversity #marineexplorer

Fish diversity #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

An interesting collection of species at Shiprock. They’re not really schooling together – just happen to be hanging out in the same place.

Rockpools at Oak Park #marineexplorer by John…

Rockpools at Oak Park #marineexplorer

Rockpools at Oak Park #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

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The complexity of habitat in the intertidal zone is clear in this shot – thousands of nooks and crannies for animals to shelter in. Oak Park

Gum tree hollow at sunrise #marineexplorer by…

Gum tree hollow at sunrise #marineexplorer

Gum tree hollow at sunrise #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

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Why shouldn’t we knock down old growth native forest and re-plant it? One reason (among many) is tree hollows. Small hollows take around 100 years to form; large hollows take several hundred years. They are essential as nests and shelter for almost half of our native mammals, and a quarter of our native birds and reptiles. These species can’t wait hundreds of years until the next hollows form.

Nature’s natural vacuum cleaners – Oyst…

Nature's natural vacuum cleaners - Oyster layer #marineexplorer

Nature’s natural vacuum cleaners – Oyster layer #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Oysters feed by filtering the sea water. They were once so abundant that they would have contributed substantially to keeping our waters clean. Today, there are still some healthy patches, like these at Shiprock. Overharvesting, pollution and seawalls continue to threaten oysters, although they are being restored to some areas www.wrl.unsw.edu.au/research/oyster-reef-restoration-project