Category: deep sea

nurnhilde:

Opisthoteuthis californiana, also known as the flapjack octopus, is a species of umbrella octopus. Their maximum size is 20 centimetres (7.9 in) mantle length. They have eight jointed legs which are affixed together in an umbrella shape and have a gelatinous body, which spreads into a parachute shape when manoeuvring through dimly lit water.

end0skeletal:

Ocean Photography by Japan’s Ryo Minemizu

Melanocetidae (Larval female anglerfish) 

by Dante Fenolio

fresherbrine:

4/17/2018 National Science Foundation: Giant group of octopus moms discovered in the deep sea

Histioteuthis bonnellii. (Jewel squid)

Credit: David Shale/MAR-ECO, Census of Marine Life

Tomopteris carpenter. (Striped deep sea worm)

Credit: © Hauke Flores, AWI

typhlonectes:

Bone-eating worms (Osedax sp.)

Dead whales that sink to the seafloor provide a feast for deep-sea
animals that can last for years.

It sounds like a classic horror
story—eyeless, mouthless worms lurk in the dark, settling onto dead
animals and sending out green “roots” to devour their bones.

But in the
deep sea, truth is stranger than fiction and these bone worms, named
Osedax (latin for bone-eating) are often found carpeting bones that have
sunk tot he seafloor.

After planting several dead whales on the
seafloor, MBARI biologists found that more than 15 different species of
boneworms live in Monterey Bay alone.

via:
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI)

typhlonectes:

Bone-eating worms (Osedax sp.)

Dead whales that sink to the seafloor provide a feast for deep-sea
animals that can last for years.

It sounds like a classic horror
story—eyeless, mouthless worms lurk in the dark, settling onto dead
animals and sending out green “roots” to devour their bones.

But in the
deep sea, truth is stranger than fiction and these bone worms, named
Osedax (latin for bone-eating) are often found carpeting bones that have
sunk tot he seafloor.

After planting several dead whales on the
seafloor, MBARI biologists found that more than 15 different species of
boneworms live in Monterey Bay alone.

via:
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI)

Phronima

Credit: © David Shale

Neolithodes sp. (Spiny Deepsea King Crab)

Credit: © David Shale