Category: facts

sciencefriday: Life is hard for the mighty cep…

sciencefriday:

Life is hard for the mighty cephalopod. “If you’re a cephalopod, you’re super easy to eat,” says Sarah McAnulty, a squid biologist. “You’re basically a swimming protein bar.”

She studies a species of cephalopod called the Hawaiian bobtail squid. While most cephalopods have flashy adaptations to stay off predators’ dinner menus this particular squid relies on something that many other cephalopods don’t—its bacteria BFF.

Although some invading bacteria are destroyed by cells within the bobtail, their immune systems can learn to recognize “beneficial bacteria,” or bacteria that is ignored, and may even receive help from the immune system if it proves helpful to the livelihood of the animal. Learn more about the Bobtail squid’s BFF in the latest Macroscope video! 

seatrench: The Blue Ringed Octopus is one of t…

seatrench:

The Blue Ringed Octopus is one of the most venomous marine animals.  Despite its small size,  12 – 20cm,  their venom is capable of killing 26 adults within minutes.  Their venom is a powerful tetrododoxin found in their saliva,  which affects the nervous system and causes severe paralysis,  leaving the victim unable to breathe.  Because the bite is small and often painless many victims do not realize they have been bitten.  It is possible to survive a Blue Ringed Octopus bite with artificial respiration.

(source)

fychanyan: Dumbo Octopus is a term used to re…

fychanyan:

Dumbo Octopus is a term used to refer to all octopuses in the genus Grimpoteuthis, referencing the ear-like fins they have on their heads. Their flapping fins are used for propulsion, while their tentacles are used like a rudder to control their direction.

Mark Trail Comic Strip for October 07, 2018

Mark Trail Comic Strip for October 07, 2018:

postcardsfromspace:

Seriously considering adding a third life event to my Facebook.

(Also, a whole lot of love and gratitude to James Allen, who is both an very kind person and a delightful goofball, and who can rock a fuchsia velvet blazer like nobody’s business.)

fuckyeahaquaria: Atlantic Bobtail Squid |  Se…

042_adj_DSC_7214 bobtail squid

fuckyeahaquaria:

Atlantic Bobtail Squid

Sepiola atlantica

This pear-shaped squid is akin to a wizard with its own invisibility cloak due to a symbiotic relationship with bioluminescent bacteria that lives in a special light organ in its mantle. When the squid leaves the safety of the seafloor to hunt at night, the bacteria hides the squid’s silhouette by matching the amount of light hitting the top of its mantle—making it virtually invisible in moonlit waters when viewed from below. In return, the small squid provides the bacteria with a sugar and amino acid solution to feed on.

Materials science experts in the U.S. Air Force have studied the symbiotic relationship between the squid and its bacteria to see if the reflective qualities could be used to improve their aircraft camouflage.

252mya: Sphooceras Artwork by Franz Anthony / …

252mya:

Sphooceras

Artwork by Franz Anthony / @franzanth

Shelled cephalopods are born small then grow a bigger house while keeping their baby crib intact — but adult Sphooceras cut off its baby coils. This 410 million years old fossil had Nautilus-like stripes, which helped it hide from predators.

252MYA creates custom-made artwork for private collections and editorial, scientific, or educational project.

noaasanctuaries: A day octopus – or he’e mauli…

noaasanctuaries:

A day octopus – or he’e mauli in Hawaiian – sits pretty at Pearl and Hermes Atoll in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. 

Many cephalopods have special cells in their skin tissue called chromatophores that enable them to change color very rapidly. A part of their neuromuscular system, these cells receive signals from the environment that an octopus can use to inform color change. Octopodes of this particular species can change color almost instantly as they move over their environment, making them nearly invisible to predators! 

(Photo: Andrew Gray/NOAA) 

[Image description: An orange and white octopus sits on a coral reef. The octopus’s coloration and texture makes it well-camouflaged with the coral around it.]

oceanportal: Fun Fact #5: The Dumbo octopus sw…

oceanportal:

Fun Fact #5:

The Dumbo octopus swims by moving its fins, pulsing its webbed arms, or pushing water through its funnel for jet propulsion.

Photo Credit: MBARI

fuckyeahaquaria: Striped Pyjama Squid |  Sepi…

Striped Pyjama Squid - Sepioloidea lineolata

fuckyeahaquaria:

Striped Pyjama Squid

Sepioloidea lineolata.

Pyjama squid are TINY. They typically grow to be a mere two inches long: not too much bigger than the shrimp they like to eat!

These little cephalopods spend most of the day under the sand. It’s the perfect place to hide from predators, but it also provides the cover this animal needs to ambush prey. The pyjama squid is nocturnal, though, emerging at night to hunt for dinner.

252mya: Cenoceras Artwork by Franz Anthony / @…

252mya:

Cenoceras

Artwork by Franz Anthony / @franzanth

While ammonites have all gone extinct, the ancestors of the nautilus-like Cenoceras were spared thanks to their slower pace of life. It allowed them to survive extinctions by waiting out less-than-ideal conditions for a few years.

252MYA creates custom-made artwork for private collections and editorial, scientific, or educational project.