Category: fish

elisafriesen: I’m adding things to my Etsy sho…

elisafriesen:

I’m adding things to my Etsy shop! Today’s new stuff is 3 art cards, all 5 x 7", with octopuses and fishes. More to come soon. Have a peek at the listings, and thanks so much for looking!

https://etsy.me/2rzjosk – indigo goldfish
https://etsy.me/2rAwrJT – green and copper octopus
https://etsy.me/2I7PC8l – green octopus

Tripod fish

Tripod fish

image

spoopy / eerie / creepy / spooky / terrifying / ghastly / sinister / CURSED

Assuming that you mean Ipnopidae as opposed to Triacanthidae here, tripod fish aren’t too bad. Sure they stand on the sea floor, but they don’t really do anything else with them. If they were to start going full War of the Worlds on us and start striding around the abyss, then they’d probably rank higher.

Compare their tripod structures to fish like gurnards which use rays on their pectoral fins to walk around like fish-insects:

(image taken from Dr Diva Amon’s Twitter. Original ask prompt is found here.)

eartharchives: A bare-bones look at bizarre fi…

eartharchives:

A bare-bones look at bizarre fish

Modern fish make up a huge part of Earth’s ecosystems, and cover a lot of niches. Predators, omnivores and herbivores are all found in this diverse group. Millions of years of adaptation has sculpted their bodies into the various forms and shapes we see today.

Looking beneath the surface of a fish’s skin can reveal a lot about the ecology of fish – the most diverse group of vertebrates on Earth. Use our image sliders to see under their scales.

Written by @cyan-biologist, with original X-ray images from Fish Inside Out, by @smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, reconstructed by @franzanth.

Love me a bizarre fish or two!

The E/V Nautilus team are in Papahānaumokuākea…

The E/V Nautilus team are in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument seeking out new discoveries in biology, geology, and archaeology. They came across this Gulper Eel (Eurypharynx pelecanoides) showing off for the camera! 

“Its pouch-like mouth can inflate in an instant, scooping up much larger prey just like a pelican–and giving it that muppet-like look! This gulper eel was likely a juvenile, as this species can grow up to three feet in length.”

marzmelloz:

marzmelloz:

I can’t do Mermay all month so I just sketched a few today

Marine reserves need to be sanctuary in order…

Marine reserves need to be sanctuary in order to work #marineexplorer

Marine reserves need to be sanctuary in order to work #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Marine reserves have a range of zoning rules, from sanctuary (no-take) to reserves that allow some fishing (partial protection). Do all of these work? Numerous studies, from regional to global, conclude that marine reserves have to be sanctuary zone to be effective. In most cases, partial protection is no better than no protection at all. Read this study for example rdcu.be/IuoS

oligib-art:

oligib-art:

Fishy wallpaper

Fish don’t care for Facebook #marineexp…

Fish don't care for Facebook #marineexplorer

Fish don’t care for Facebook #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

As people spend more and more time on social media, we run the risk of thinking that’s where reality lies. But fish don’t care for Facebook – they care for habitat and water to live in, finding food and a mate, and not being eaten. The human footprint on earth is now so large that we have to accept the role of stewards – whether we like it or not – and future generations will judge us by what we do in the real world.

jaegerpilotmax:

jaegerpilotmax:

Some graphic summery sea critters I doodled a few weeks ago

Sharing our much-loved coastline #marineexplo…

Sharing our much-loved coastline #marineexplorer

Sharing our much-loved coastline #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

85% of Australians live within 50 km of the coast. Our coastal lifestyle faces increasing pressures from climate change, urbanisation, pollution, unsustainable use of resources and more. As the human footprint increases, we have to accept our role as stewards of our world – whether we like it or not. This means more active management, and keeping an open mind to changes that are necessary to conserve the very lifestyle we love