Category: marine life

wapiti3: The sea shore

wapiti3:

The sea shore

By Furneaux, William S.
Publication info
London,Longmans, Green and Co.,1922.
Holding Institution:
MBLWHOI Library
BIODIV LIBRARY

Marine reserves need to be sanctuary in order…

Marine reserves need to be sanctuary in order to work #marineexplorer

Marine reserves need to be sanctuary in order to work #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Marine reserves have a range of zoning rules, from sanctuary (no-take) to reserves that allow some fishing (partial protection). Do all of these work? Numerous studies, from regional to global, conclude that marine reserves have to be sanctuary zone to be effective. In most cases, partial protection is no better than no protection at all. Read this study for example rdcu.be/IuoS

First known omnivorous shark species identifie…

First known omnivorous shark species identified:

I don’t think we’ll ever know the true depth of the ocean’s mysteries!

Fish don’t care for Facebook #marineexp…

Fish don't care for Facebook #marineexplorer

Fish don’t care for Facebook #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

As people spend more and more time on social media, we run the risk of thinking that’s where reality lies. But fish don’t care for Facebook – they care for habitat and water to live in, finding food and a mate, and not being eaten. The human footprint on earth is now so large that we have to accept the role of stewards – whether we like it or not – and future generations will judge us by what we do in the real world.

Sharing our much-loved coastline #marineexplo…

Sharing our much-loved coastline #marineexplorer

Sharing our much-loved coastline #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

85% of Australians live within 50 km of the coast. Our coastal lifestyle faces increasing pressures from climate change, urbanisation, pollution, unsustainable use of resources and more. As the human footprint increases, we have to accept our role as stewards of our world – whether we like it or not. This means more active management, and keeping an open mind to changes that are necessary to conserve the very lifestyle we love

The strong science of marine reserves #marine…

The strong science of marine reserves #marineexplorer

The strong science of marine reserves #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

At a time when self-interested minorities seem to command the headlines, it’s worth remembering that the science behind marine reserves is strong, and supported by the vast majority of marine ecologists and scientists. For example www.amsa.asn.au/sites/default/files/AMSA-ACRS_Concensus%2…

Crab in camo – Sponge Decorator Crab – Hyaste…

Crab in cammo - Sponge Decorator Crab - Hyastenus elatus #marineexplorer

Crab in camo – Sponge Decorator Crab – Hyastenus elatus #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Crab in camo gear – can you see it? Decorator crabs have special hooks on their carapace that allow them to attach sponges, which then grow to cover the crab. To see a close up, scroll to the next picture. Clifton Gardens jetty.

Could seaweed solve Indonesia’s plastic crisis…

Could seaweed solve Indonesia’s plastic crisis?:

Seaweed is cheap to produce as it is cultivated offshore, grows quickly and doesn’t require fresh water or chemicals to grow successfully. Seaweed beds are also natural carbon sinks, de-acidifying water. 

Monacanthus chinensis leatherjacket #marineex…

Monacanthus chinensis leatherjacket #marineexplorer

Monacanthus chinensis leatherjacket #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Clifton Gardens

Billions of pieces of plastic on coral reefs s…

Billions of pieces of plastic on coral reefs send disease soaring, research reveals:

This study didn’t originate as a plastic one, but they couldn’t avoid it. The correlation between plastic and disease was strong across 159 reefs over three years. That is terrifying. 

  • Coral reefs in the [Asia Pacific] region are contaminated with ~11bn pieces of plastic
  • At least 8 million tonnes of plastic enter the ocean every year 
  • The correlation between plastic pollution and high rates of disease was very striking  
  • Researchers think sharp plastic fragments cut the coral organisms, while plastic fabrics smother them and block out light and oxygen.
  • “Plastics are ideal vessels for microorganisms, with pits and pores, so it’s like cutting yourself with a really dirty knife.”

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Your single-use plastic use may be a drop in the ocean, but it ALL counts. I’ve not managed to get rid of all plastic, but here’s what I do:

– Worked on saying “No straw” and “No plastic bag” automatically when ordering or shopping. The straw one was hard to keep remembering, but it’s habit now. 

– Bring my own containers if I buy meat at the supermarket so it doesn’t go in a plastic bag. They just stick the price label on the lid. 

– Buy my veggies from the local market, they’re always wrapped in plastic in the supermarket. Obviously bringing my own shopping bags.

– Try to buy the products that don’t come with plastic packaging or buy in bulk so it’s less

– Shifting to more natural “beauty products” so I don’t have to keep buying the packaged stuff. I use virgin coconut oil as a cleanser, and have started buying Lush no-packaging shampoos etc when I can. 

– Bring my own boxes for takeaways. Asking for pizza leftovers in foil, not plastic. 

– Shifting to glass Tupperware and metal wire hangers. 

– Use beeswax wraps instead of cling wrap.

– I can’t bring myself to buy plastic jewellery anymore, it just seems so superfluous, or little plastic trinkets. Luckily Lumago is right on my door step. 

Living in Philippines, a tropical country with humidity and oh-so-many ants can make plastic harder to escape from, plus it’s so automatic to be given a plastic bag for everything. Working on one plastic aspect of my life (saying no to straws) was the catalyst to actively noticing what I was buying/consuming. With the decision to drastically cut down plastic use, it became a lot easier to get creative with solutions. 

My advice is not to get overwhelmed by it all, and just to start with one thing. That already makes a difference. Keep in mind your decision to reduce plastic consumption and don’t beat yourself up for forgetting. Just keep improving. That’s all any of us can do.