Category: marine

Bottle in the mangroves #marineexplorer by Jo…

Bottle in the mangroves #marineexplorer

Bottle in the mangroves #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

It may be green, but it’s not Green! Sydney Olympic Park

The magic donkey likes my tube anemone #marin…

The magic donkey likes my tube anemone #marineexplorer

The magic donkey likes my tube anemone #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Flickr Explore is a daily showcase of what Flickr considers to be the most interesting pictures around the world. The decision is made by an algorithm jokingly called the “magic donkey”, based on activity such as views, comments etc. Today, the magic donkey chose my tube anemone pic. Clifton Gardens

Sharing a home – cuttlefish and pineapplefish…

Sharing a home - cuttlefish and pineapplefish #marineexplorer

Sharing a home – cuttlefish and pineapplefish #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

I wonder if two’s a crowd under this log at Clifton Gardens? The cuttlefish looks unimpressed.

Kelp broken off by fishing line #marineexplor…

Kelp broken off by fishing line #marineexplorer

Kelp broken off by fishing line #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

In the shallow subtidal environment, fishing line is the single largest source of marine debris (Smith 2014 Plos One). Fishing line is of course plastic, so stays in the environment for hundreds of years. Whilst there, it can entangle and damage marine life, like this kelp. Zoom in to see the entanglement in the holdfast. Clifton Gardens

Marine reserves need to be sanctuary in order…

Marine reserves need to be sanctuary in order to work #marineexplorer

Marine reserves need to be sanctuary in order to work #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Marine reserves have a range of zoning rules, from sanctuary (no-take) to reserves that allow some fishing (partial protection). Do all of these work? Numerous studies, from regional to global, conclude that marine reserves have to be sanctuary zone to be effective. In most cases, partial protection is no better than no protection at all. Read this study for example rdcu.be/IuoS

Gymnothorax prasinus moray – watching from th…

Gymnothorax prasinus moray - watching from the cave #marineexplorer

Gymnothorax prasinus moray – watching from the cave #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

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Shiprock, Sydney

Beach games #marineexplorer by John Turnbull …

Beach games #marineexplorer

Beach games #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

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It’s easy to forget that the highest users of our beautiful coastal environment are walkers, swimmers and beachgoers – like these energetic people at Manly Beach

Ascidian mob #marineexplorer by John Turnbull…

Ascidian mob #marineexplorer

Ascidian mob #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

This shot from Henry Head in Botany Bay shows just how successful ascidians are.

Fish don’t care for Facebook #marineexp…

Fish don't care for Facebook #marineexplorer

Fish don’t care for Facebook #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

As people spend more and more time on social media, we run the risk of thinking that’s where reality lies. But fish don’t care for Facebook – they care for habitat and water to live in, finding food and a mate, and not being eaten. The human footprint on earth is now so large that we have to accept the role of stewards – whether we like it or not – and future generations will judge us by what we do in the real world.

Marine reserves build resilience to climate c…

Marine reserves build resilience to climate change #marineexplorer

Marine reserves build resilience to climate change #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Climate change is regarded by many as the major environmental issue of our time. Oceans face a triple whammy of warming, acidification and rising sea levels. Tackling climate change will take global cooperation, but is there anything we can do at a local level? Research has shown that the increased biodiversity in marine reserves builds resilience to climate change, so our marine communities are better equipped to handle future climate pressures. Refs: Harley et al 2006 Ecol Letters, Bernhardt & Leslie 2012 Annu. Rev. Mar. Sci