Category: marineexplorer

Small marine reserves can work if sanctuary, …

Small marine reserves can work if sanctuary, well located and managed #marineexplorer

Small marine reserves can work if sanctuary, well located and managed #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Whilst the most effective marine reserve are large ones, small reserves can work if they are full sanctuary zones, located in sheltered areas with complex habitat, and supported by the local community. Fly Point is Port Stephens is a great example with incredible fish diversity and abundance. See our 2018 paper rdcu.be/IuoS

Sun disc #marineexplorer by John Turnbull V…

Sun disc #marineexplorer

Sun disc #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

When the density of cloud is right, you can see the disc of the sun – remarkably similar to that of the moon. The sun is over 400 times bigger than the moon, and almost 400 times the distance from earth. Port Stephens

Mooring scars #marineexplorer by John Turnbul…

Mooring scars #marineexplorer

Mooring scars #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Traditional moorings using a dragging chain which scours the sea floor, killing seagrass. You can see the mooring scars in this pic as the light patches in front of the moored boats. This adds up to a lot of seagrass loss when multiplied by hundreds of moorings in an area. Seagrass-friendly moorings address this problem by replacing the chain with a suspended bar, but they require investment and acceptance of new technologies. Port Stephens

Corynactis australis jewel anemones coating a…

Corynactis australis jewel anemones coating a boulder #marineexplorer

Corynactis australis jewel anemones coating a boulder #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

These anemones can be solitary or live in a colony as in this shot. They can also be a range of colours including pink and purple. Related to corals, these anemones are part of the corallimorph family, the members of which are mostly tropical.

Dolphins and pelicans at Halifax #marineexplo…

Dolphins and pelicans at Halifax #marineexplorer

Dolphins and pelicans at Halifax #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

People can enjoy marine life without getting wet – dolphins and marine birds are some of the favourites at Halifax, Nelson Bay. In a 10 minute stretch we saw three dolphins (one mother and baby pair) and six bird species – pelicans, silver gulls, crested terns, sooty oystercatchers, black cormorants and a stunning pair of sea eagles

JT at Fly Point #marineexplorer by John Turnb…

JT at Fly Point #marineexplorer

JT at Fly Point #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Great Southern Reef Field Trip, Day 1 – Nelsons Bay. Over the next four months I’ll be surveying from Port Stephens to Perth, researching people’s perceptions and stewardship of the marine environment.

Shell surprise! Pagurus sinuatus Hairy Pink H…

Shell surprise! Pagurus sinuatus Hairy Pink Hermit Crab #marineexplorer

Shell surprise! Pagurus sinuatus Hairy Pink Hermit Crab #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

When we do biodiversity surveys we turn over suspect shells to see if there’s anything living inside. Sometimes we get a hairy surprise! Gordon’s Bay

Anemone cave #marineexplorer by John Turnbull…

Anemone cave #marineexplorer

Anemone cave #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

North Head Sydney Harbour

Dicotylichthys punctulatus – Three-bar porcup…

Dicotylichthys punctulatus - Three-bar porcupinefish #marineexplorer

Dicotylichthys punctulatus – Three-bar porcupinefish #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

I’ve noticed these long porcupinefish spend quite a lot of time chilling in grooves and overhangs, then fire into life from time to time. They are slow swimmers, so they seem to lumber along despite their frantically fluttering fins. Sydney Harbour North Head

Good marina and boat stewardship #marineexplo…

Good marina and boat stewardship #marineexplorer

Good marina and boat stewardship #marineexplorer by John Turnbull

Via Flickr:

Boats and marinas are an essential part of experiencing our oceans. But they can also be vectors for invasive species, which can hitch a ride in ballast water, on hulls and anchors. Good stewardship includes managing ballast water according to guidelines, anti-foul coatings (although these have other environmental consequences), regular inspection and cleaning www.marinepests.gov.au/recreation-community